Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Phi Sigma Iota Inductees and Graduating Seniors to be Honored April 15th

Gamma Tau Chapter of the international foreign language honor society Phi Sigma Iota will induct sixteen new members: Jenna Beadle, Alaina Bosak, Nicole Buhr, Caitlin Casavecchia, Kimberly Coates, Molly Leonard, Ashley Miklas, Hilary Neal, Christina Neely, Stefanie Stoops, Camille Talarico, Calley Taylor, Lindsey Tippett, Pablo Uranga, Tiffany Urig, and Jennifer Winkler.  With this spring's initiates, the chapter will have inducted 134 students since the installation of Phi Sigma Iota at A.U. in 1997.

The honor society will also recognize graduating seniors with purple and white honor cords.  Graduating this May are Jenna Beadle, Alaina Bosak, Caitlin Casavecchia, Andrea Catanzarito, Kimberly Coates, Caitlin Dalton, Molly Leonard, and Christina Neely.  Graduating in December 2012 is Jennifer Winkler.

Congratulations initiates and graduating seniors!

HEALTH PROMOTERS HELP BRIDGE THE LANGUAGE GAP

Follow this link to read an article on the work of Spanish-speaking health promoters in Indiana.

(Click on above "link")

Monday, February 27, 2012

A BUSINESS CORRESPONDENT'S PERSPECTIVE ON FOREIGN LANGUAGES

Robert Lane Greene, business correspondent for The Economist in New York and the author of "You Are What you Speak" gives his perspectives on the usefulness of French in the article linked below:

Which is the best language to learn?

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Report Shows Importance of Multilingualism in Business

Report Shows Importance of Multilingualism in Business
(The Language Educator – November 2011 – p. 8)

A new study released in early October by Forbes Insights says that U. S. companies will perform better by hiring individuals who can communicate in foreign languages and by helping current employees develop language skills.
               
“Language Study: Reducing the Impact of Language Barriers” is based on an exclusive survey of more than 100 executives at large U. S. businesses (annual revenues of more than $500 million).  According to the study, more than half (65%) of companies surveyed face language barriers that contribute to inefficiency, ineffective collaboration, and low productivity, among other factors.
               
Other key findings include:
·         Overseas assignments have become more common among executives.  Nine in 10 respondents agreed that international firms would not be able to compete successfully without world class managers worldwide.
·         Three-quarters of respondents agreed that it was easier for foreign nationals to work in the United States than for U. S. nationals to work overseas because they are more likely to be multilingual.  This leaves U. S.-based organizations, as well as many Americans, at a disadvantage.
·         Companies are responding to the need for multilingual executives.  Two in three firms (66%) said they expected U. S. executives going abroad to have basic or intermediate proficiency in the native language.

Thursday, February 16, 2012

Teaching Positions at Hilliard City School District

The Hilliard City School system is looking to hire between 50-60 teachers as a result of an early retirement program.  Attached please find information about the Job Fair scheduled for March 15 at the Davidson High School.


For more information, click here.

Thursday, February 9, 2012

Professor Bansen-Harp publishes article

Lisa Bansen-Harp, Assistant Professor of French, published an article in the December 2011 issue of Medievalia et Humanistica: Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Culture (vol. 37).  Entitled  “Ironic Patterning and Numerical Composition in the Vie de saint Alexis: Form and Effect / Affect,” the article examines the structuring of the earliest poetic text in the French language.  It analyzes how the poet’s use of dramatic and biblical modes of irony allowed this account of an inscrutable ascetic saint to touch a broad audience.  The text is important not only for its literary beauty, but also for its pivotal position at a time when the Church was reaching out to laypeople, using their language as well as Latin to preach and teach.